Male Companionship

Torrin and Restar Lucky JoeMy Norwegian Fjord gelding Torrin has spent the vast majority of his fifteen years with me in the company of mares.  That’s in part because I prefer mares and in part because as a breeder I have mares and stallions but rarely geldings, and many more females than males.  It’s never seemed to bother Torrin.  He’s pushed nearly all of them around at will.  He’s also shown me that some he prefers more than others.

For the past six months, Torrin has been housed with my stud colt Restar Lucky Joe.  It’s not the first time that he’s shared space with a Fell Pony stallion.  He kept my first stallion Midnight Valley Timothy company one winter a decade ago.  I’ve never let Torrin spend time with my senior stallion Guards Apollo because they are too alike in temperament.  They prefer to be top pony, and I wouldn’t want the vet bills that might result from that competition.  Interestingly, Midnight and Lucky Joe have similarities besides a laid-back temperament.  They both have healthy amounts of Heltondale in their pedigrees.  My mentor Joe Langcake has told me that he found Heltondales in general to have amongst the best temperaments in the breed.

While it’s not the first time that Torrin has shared space with a Fell stallion, I have witnessed a first with he and Lucky Joe.  I’ve watched them mutually groom each other, something that only occasional pairs of ponies will do.  I’m glad that Torrin is so appreciating the male companionship of Lucky Joe.  And vice versa!

© Jenifer Morrissey, 2015

What an HonorA Humbling ExperienceIf you enjoyed this story, you might also enjoy the books A Humbling Experience and What an Honor, available internationally by clicking here.

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About workponies

Breeder of Fell Ponies, teamster of work ponies, and author of Feather Notes, Fell Pony News, and A Humbling Experience: My First Few Years with Fell Ponies. Distributor of Dynamite Specialty Products for the health of our planet and the beings I share it with.
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